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EBSA overview  |  Delineation |  Proposed description

 

 

EBSA overview

The Protea Seamount Cluster is in the south Atlantic abyss off the SSW flank of the Agulhas continental shelf, within the South African EEZ. It is a unique feature in that it is the only seamount cluster in the south Atlantic abyss in South Africa’s EEZ. The seamounts support more productivity and diversity compared to adjacent sites, and offer a site for migratory species to aggregate around. Notably, the Protea Seamount Cluster contains vulnerable and sensitive ecosystems and species, some of which are threatened, e.g. the site is visited by regionally Critically Endangered leatherback turtles. It is in good condition given the currently low anthropogenic pressure in the area, promoting the importance of its protection. This EBSA is particularly relevant for its: Uniqueness and rarity; Importance for threatened or declining species and habitats; Vulnerability and sensitivity; and Naturalness.

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Delineation

Open or collapse the legend as a sidebar by clicking the icon in the top left corner of the map. In the legend you can turn on/off the old/new extents of the EBSA. You can zoom in/out using the mouse or the +/- buttons on the map, and click on the features for more information.

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Proposed EBSA description

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Summary

The Protea Seamount Cluster is in the south Atlantic abyss off the SSW flank of the Agulhas continental shelf, within the South African EEZ. It is a unique feature in that it is the only seamount cluster in the south Atlantic abyss in South Africa’s EEZ. The seamounts support more productivity and diversity compared to adjacent sites, and offer a site for migratory species to aggregate around. Notably, the Protea Seamount Cluster contains vulnerable and sensitive ecosystems and species, some of which are threatened, e.g. the site is visited by regionally Critically Endangered leatherback turtles. It is in good condition given the currently low anthropogenic pressure in the area, promoting the importance of its protection. This EBSA is particularly relevant for its: Uniqueness and rarity; Importance for threatened or declining species and habitats; Vulnerability and sensitivity; and Naturalness.

 

Introduction

The Protea Seamount Cluster focus area lies on the SSW flank of the Agulhas continental shelf: an oceanic plateau that extends several hundreds of kilometres south of South Africa. The focus area is south west of the Browns Bank EBSA, entirely within and up to the edge of the South African EEZ. The site includes the base of the lower slope, but falls mainly within the south Atlantic abyss. Late Eocene volcanism created the seamount cluster in this focus area, including Protea and Argentina Seamounts (among others). The Agulhas Current, which flows south-westward along the eastern coast of South Africa, has its retroflection in this area. Given this position, and its location relative to the Agulhas basin and Agulhas continental shelf, the seamount cluster is an important aggregation site for several migratory species, such as sharks, tuna, and turtles. These animals are also likely attracted to the site for the higher local productivity that is usually associated with seamounts. The Protea Seamount Cluster also contains vulnerable, fragile and sensitive ecosystems and species, and thus the focus area both includes and is important for both benthic and pelagic features. It is considered highly relevant in terms of the following EBSA criteria: “Uniqueness and rarity”, “Importance for threatened or declining ecosystems and species”, and “Naturalness”.

 

This site was recognised as important at the original South Eastern Atlantic Workshop for EBSA Identification in 2013, but that there was not enough information available to score it against the EBSA criteria at the time (see UNEP/CBD/RW/EBSA/SEA/1/4 Annex 6, Area 5). However, some new data and information have now made description and delineation of the EBSA possible, although criterion rankings still rely heavily on inferred information in many cases. Therefore, the criteria were benchmarked against those ranks given to other EBSAs described for seamounts specifically (see the section: Other relevant website address or attached documents). The seamounts are the underpinning feature of this EBSA, but it also comprises additional features and ecosystems that are connected by seamount-related ecological processes. Consequently, it is proposed as a Type 2 EBSA (sensu Johnson et al. 2018).

 

Description of the location

EBSA Region

South-Eastern Atlantic

 

Location

The Protea Seamount Cluster focus area occurs within the national jurisdiction of South Africa. It is found in the south Atlantic abyss off the SSW flank of the Agulhas continental shelf: an oceanic plateau that extends several hundreds of kilometres south of South Africa. It lies south west of the Browns Bank EBSA, and extends to the boundary of South Africa’s EEZ.

 

Feature description of the proposed area

The Protea Seamount Cluster focus area is important for both its benthic and pelagic features, notably for supporting threatened habitats and species, and vulnerable, fragile and sensitive ecosystems and species. It comprises a seamount cluster that includes the Protea Seamount, and a few others, that rise from the southeast Atlantic abyss. The Agulhas Current, which flows south-westward along the eastern coast of South Africa, has its retroflection in this area. Given this position, and its location relative to the Agulhas basin and Agulhas continental shelf, local productivity is high at the site. Consequently, it serves as an important aggregation site for migratory species, such as sharks, seabirds (Halpin et al., 2009), and tuna. Further, adult female leatherback turtles have been satellite tracked to these seamounts and surrounds following nesting (Luschi et al., 2003, 2006, Robinson 2014, Harris et al., 2018), with the site likely used by juvenile turtles as well. There has been one previous scientific expedition to Protea Seamount (in 2001), which was focused on deep-sea pelagic birds.

 

The Protea Seamount Cluster had a high selection frequency in two systematic conservation plans to represent biodiversity efficiently (Majiedt et al., 2013; Sink et al., 2011). The focus area was delineated based on this selection frequency, key features (seamounts, fragile and sensitive habitat-forming species, and portions of threatened habitat in good condition), and to align with a national initiative to expand MPAs in South Africa. Protecting this site is important because of its vulnerability to both pelagic fishing and benthic trawling. Although no research is currently planned for this area, it is recommended for this EBSA, particularly towards informing appropriate spatial management of this site.

 

Note that there are other seamounts in the surrounding area that are not included in the delineation of the EBSA because they are either unnamed, or there are no records of fragile, habitat-forming species for these sites and they are considered data deficient. There is a matrix of abyssal and and bathyal habitat in between the seamouts that is included in the delineation because it represents the broader area where the top predators aggregate in the water column in response to the elevated productivity of the site, likely also encompassing the full extent of seamount-related ecological processes. In addition, it is an efficient way to include a natural, near-pristine portion of these habitat types in the EBSA network that is likely to be take up in spatial management processes for the seamounts themselves, especially because these areas were identified as a priority in the two systematic conservation plans mentioned above.

 

Feature condition and future outlook of the proposed area

Sink et al. (2012) estimated the threat status of the 60 offshore benthic habitat types identified for South Africa by assessing the cumulative impacts of various pressures (e.g. extractive resource use, pollution and others) on each habitat type. All of the three types of benthic habitat that are most prominent in the EBSA have been shown to be Least Threatened in terms of threat status (Sink et al., 2012), indicating that most of these habitats (in the associated bioregion) is in good (natural or pristine) or fair condition. The area is however highly vulnerable to exploitation due to its unprotected status. The area is in a good condition, largely because it has been subjected to relatively little extractive resource use (e.g. fishing, mining) pressure, and is relatively remote and often subjected to high seas with winds of around 50 knots.

 

References

Halpin, P.N., A.J. Read, E. Fujioka, B.D. Best, B. Donnelly, L.J. Hazen, C. Kot, K. Urian, E. LaBrecque, A. Dimatteo, J. Cleary, C. Good, L.B. Crowder, and K.D. Hyrenbach. 2009. OBIS-SEAMAP: The world data center for marine mammal, sea bird, and sea turtle distributions. Oceanography, 22: 104-115

Harris, L.R., Nel, R., Oosthuizen, H., Meyer, M., Kotze, D., Anders, D., McCue, S., Bachoo, S. 2018. Managing conflicts between economic activities and threatened migratory marine species towards creating a multi-objective blue economy. Conservation Biology, 32: 411-423.

Johnson, D.E., Barrio Froján, C., Turner, P.J., Weaver, P., Gunn, V., Dunn, D.C., Halpin, P., Bax, N.J., Dunstan, P.K., 2018. Reviewing the EBSA process: Improving on success. Marine Policy 88, 75-85.

Luschi, P., Sale, A., Mencacci, R., Hughes, G.R., Lutjeharms, J.R.E., Papi, F. 2003. Current transport of leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) in the ocean. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences, 270: S129-S132.

Luschi, P., Lutjeharms, J.R.E., Lambardi, P., Mencacci, R., Hughes, G.R., and Hays, G.C. 2006. A review of migratory behaviour of sea turtles off southeastern Africa. South African Journal of Science, 102: 51-58.

Majiedt, P., Holness, S., Sink, K., Oosthuizen, A., Chadwick, P. 2013. Systematic Marine Biodiversity Plan for the West Coast of South Africa. South African National Biodiversity Institute, Cape Town.

Robinson, N. 2014. Migratory ecology of sea turtles. PhD Thesis. Perdue University, United States of America.

Sink, K.J., Attwood, C.G., Lombard, A.T., Grantham, H., Leslie, R., Samaai, T., Kerwath, S., Majiedt, P., Fairweather, T., Hutchings, L., van der Lingen, C., Atkinson, L.J., Wilkinson, S., Holness, S., Wolf, T. 2011. Spatial planning to identify focus areas for offshore biodiversity protection in South Africa. Unpublished Report. Cape Town: South African National Biodiversity Institute.

Sink, K., Holness, S., Harris, L., Majiedt, P., Atkinson, L., Robinson, T., Kirkman, S., Hutchings, L., Leslie, R., Lamberth, S., Kerwath, S., von der Heyden, S., Lombard, A., Attwood, C., Branch, G., Fairweather, T., Taljaard, S., Weerts, S., Cowley, P., Awad, A., Halpern, B., Grantham, H., Wolf, T. 2012. National Biodiversity Assessment 2011: Technical Report. Volume 4: Marine and Coastal Component. South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria.

 

Other relevant website address or attached documents

Frequency of the criteria ranks for EBSAs in the global network that are described specifically for seamounts (n=13): Juan Fernández Ridge Seamounts; Emperor Seamount Chain and Northern Hawaiian Ridge; North-east Pacific Ocean Seamounts; New England and Corner Rise Seamounts; Tabou Canyon and Seamount; Cayar Seamount; Atlantis Seamount; Coral Seamount and Fracture Zone Feature; Agulhas Slope and Seamounts; Central Louisville Seamount Chain; Monowai Seamount; Seamounts of West Norfolk Ridge; and  Sagami Trough and Island and Seamount Chain of Izu-Ogasawara.

Status of submission

Area to be submitted to the Conference of the Parties for acknowledgement of meeting EBSA criteria once review process is finalized.

 

COP Decision

Not yet submitted.

 

Assessment of the area against CBD EBSA Criteria

C1: Uniqueness or rarity Medium

Justification

This is the only seamount cluster in the Atlantic Ocean portion of the South African EEZ, although there are other seamount clusters in the surrounding area beyond national jurisdiction.

 

C2: Special importance for life-history stages of species Medium

Justification

Data are relatively limited for assessing this criterion. However, given the locally high productivity in the focus area, it is expected that the Protea Seamount Cluster is a key foraging site for migratory species in particular. Further, all other EBSAs globally that include seamounts rank the site at medium or high importance for this criterion, indicative of the ecological role that the feature plays in offshore systems that can be inferred here too. OBIS-SEAMAP (Halpin et al., 2009) shows 1-10 records of megavertebrate (marine mammal, seabird, sea turtle and ray and shark) observations for most of the area around these seamounts in the southeast Atlantic, and a 10-100 records within the EBSA region.

 

C3: Importance for threatened, endangered or declining species and/or habitats High

Justification

This a site where regionally Critically Endangered leatherback turtles have been recorded based on satellite tracking data (Harris et al., 2018), and a site where other threatened species (e.g., tuna, sharks and seabirds) are expected or known to occur. Data are limited for this site specifically, but global rankings of this site are either High or Medium.

 

C4: Vulnerability, fragility, sensitivity, or slow recovery High

Justification

Almost all other seamount-specific EBSAs rank this criterion as Medium or High. This is because seamounts are habitats for many indicator species of vulnerable marine ecosystems (Watling & Auster 2017). Therefore, within Protea Seamount Cluster, it is likely that there are fragile, sensitive species, such as corals and sponges, that are vulnerable to impacts on the seabed and that would take a long time to recover if impacted. This is supported by known presence localities of fragile, vulnerable and sensitive habitat-forming species (Unpublished SANBI and SAEON data) within the EBSA area. Further, the top predators that frequent this site (e.g., Harris et al., 2018) are also slow to recover from population impacts, particularly leatherback turtles given how long they take to reach sexual maturity, and the low survivorship from hatchling to adult (approximately 1 in 1000 survive).

 

C5: Biological productivity Medium

Justification

Seamounts are considered to be relatively productive systems, with most other EBSAs for seamounts ranking this criterion as High. No data are available for the Protea Seamount Cluster; however, Chlorophyll-a concentrations (MODIS-Aqua data on the NASA Giovanni Portal: https://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov/giovanni) show marginally higher values within this area compared to the surrounding abyss.

 

C6: Biological diversity Medium

Justification

No are data available, however, given the habitat heterogeneity as a result of the seamount cluster, local biodiversity is expected to be higher than adjacent sites, which is confirmed by the global rankings of seamount-specific EBSAs that score this criterion either High or Medium. Further, given the productivity and physical location that makes aggregation of migratory species likely, biodiversity is expected to be higher than the surrounding area. This is supported by the relatively greater abundances (likely representing a greater diversity of species) of megavertebrates in the EBSA region compared to that of the surrounding area (Halpin et al., 2009), and records of up to 100 species of animals in the OBIS database (http://www.iobis.org) within this EBSA.

 

C7: Naturalness High

Justification

The focus area is all assessed to be in Good condition (Sink et al., 2012), largely because the area has been subjected to relatively low levels of anthropogenic pressures because it is relatively remote and often subjected to high seas with winds of around 50 knots. This contrasts with many seamounts further north in the Benguela system that are not in good ecological condition because they have high fishing pressure.

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